When Lazarus’s owner started getting sick, a neighbor contacted Jessica Kincheloe and a fellow groomer to help him.

When the three went to look into the barn, they found the Great Pyrenees covered with months and months worth of overgrown fur. They had to fight through mounds of filth to get to the dog.

Immediately after the rescue, the groomer went on to remove 35 pounds worth of hair from Lazarus’s body.

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Sunday, September 4, 2016

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Sunday, September 4, 2016

At first, Lazarus was wary of human touch and affection. It showed that no one had ever loved him before. As he got used to his new body, Lazarus also adjusted to the people around him.

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Sunday, September 4, 2016

“He was OK with the human touch but didn’t seem familiar to it. He warmed up to us really quick. Especially after offering treats,” Kincheloe informed.

With time, Lazarus improved his movements too.

A volunteer coordinator for the Big Fluffy Dog Rescue in Nashville, Tennessee, Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey, decided to foster Lazarus. That’s when Lazarus really began to change. He’s still learning how to be a beloved pet.

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Monday, September 5, 2016

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Monday, September 5, 2016

Since Charsha-Lindsey has seen the worst cases throughout her entire journey, she wants to make sure that Laz will not end up like many of his unlucky brothers.

She wrote a heartfelt Facebook post where she spoke about Laz saying, “I sincerely hope Laz makes you smile as much as he does me and others I know. He is a sweet boy. It is rare a single pup garners this much attention to adoption and is great for awareness. We gotta chat though, okay?

Laz’s previous owners are now terminally ill. How he ended up in the stall no longer matters, as it will do nothing to help him. Pressing matters further with them is a waste of already scarce time and money, for all involved. Justice is not ours to dole out in this case.

This is about Lazarus, not them, not any person at all. This is about pulling adoption to the forefront of conversations, realizing this stuff happens anywhere you are, and making sure when you see something, you do something. Adopt from your local rescue or shelter, donate supplies, your time, or funds, open your home to an animal in need.

Let’s all keep the focus on Laz. Any negative comments/conspiracy theories/physical abuse comments will be deleted automatically, as they serve no purpose. We won’t dwell in the past with him. He has too much to look forward to now to stay in the past. We all do.

Goodnight from this badger face that doesn’t hold grudges.”

I sincerely hope Laz makes you smile as much as he does me and others I know. He is a sweet boy. It is rare a single pup…

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Friday, September 9, 2016

If you ever see an animal being abused, remember that there are hundreds more who want to take care of that animal. As Charsha-Lindsey said, awareness is what “pulls adoption to the forefront of conversations.”

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Lazarus’s name signifies the man in the Bible who was brought back from the dead.

Stages of stumbling upon Archer's marrow bone he left outside:1) Aloofness2) Acceptance3) Curiosity 4)…

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Monday, September 12, 2016

Today, Lazarus has a second chance at life.

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Friday, September 9, 2016

Just look at how happy he looks!

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Thursday, September 8, 2016

Posted by Amanda Brooke Charsha-Lindsey on Thursday, September 8, 2016

Rehabilitating Lazarus has been wonderful for Charsha-Lindsey. But he will soon be up for adoption.

“We are going on Laz time and it runs a bit behind,” Charsha-Lindsey said.

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